Petition 80611

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Drinking on Campus (80611-MH-R85)

Amend Resolution 85  
    Our Christian faith calls us to care for each other. Jesus said, “Love your neighbor as yourself.” (Matthew 19:19) Jesus also said, “Let the children come to me, and do not hinder them; for to such belongs the kingdom of heaven.” (Matthew 19:14) Jesus’ example clearly directs us to care for each other and to give young people special attention enabling them to be free from harm.
    The National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism defines binge drinking as a pattern of drinking that brings a person’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08 grams percent or above. This typically happens when men consume more than 4 drinks and women consume more than 3 drinks in about 2 hours. 1  <>WHEREAS, a B ccording to a new survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, b inge drinking is an alarming and growing problem on the rise in the United States which can lead to many alarming health-related injuries and illnesses. and is climbing fastest among 18-to 20-year-olds who are too young to drink legally; and
WHEREAS, this survey also revealed that episodes of binge drinking, defined as having five or more drinks in one sitting, increased 17 percent among all adults between 1993 and 2001, and shot up 56 percent among 18-to 20-year-olds According to national surveys:
  Approximately 92% of US adults who drink excessively, report binge drinking in the past 30 days. 2  <>

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  • The rate of binge drinking among men is 3 times the rate of women. 3  <>
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    • Binge drinkers are 14 times more likely to report alcohol-impaired driving than non-binge drinkers.  

            
    • About 90% of the alcohol consumed by youth under the age of 21 (who are too young to drink legally) in the United States is in the form of binge drinks. 4  <>
    • About 75% of the alcohol consumed by adults in the United States in the form of binge drinks. 5  <>
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      • The proportion of current drinkers that binge is highest in the 18 to 20 year old groups (52.1%). 6  <>
          The alarming increase in binge drinkers, 18-20 year old indicates that many college students in the United States continue to engage in binge drinking and drinking to get drunk, with a disturbing percentage of students reporting alcohol
related incidents, such as missing classes, personal injuries, sexual assault, or other forms of violence and vandalism ; and .
    The CDC reports that binge drinking is associated with many health problems, including but not limited to:
  Unintentional injuries (e.g. car crash, falls, burns, drowning).
      
  • Intentional injuries (e.g. firearm injuries, sexual assault, domestic violence).
  • Alcohol poisoning
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Unintended pregnancy
  • Liver disease
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    • Neurological damage. 7  <>
          WHEREAS, United Methodist colleges and universities colleges do provide an environment suitable for pursuing a higher education in a Christian atmosphere. Within this environment United Methodist colleges and universities ; and
    WHEREAS, the United Methodist-related colleges and universities do have establish policies to address related to alcohol use and abuse on their campuses. ; and
    WHEREAS, the United Methodist-related colleges and universities spent over $1.5
    million to address issues related to alcohol abuse on their campuses; and
    WHEREAS, many students nationwide continue to engage in binge drinking and drinking to get drunk, with an alarming percentage of students reporting alcohol-related incidents, such as missing classes, personal injuries, sexual assault, or other forms of violence and vandalism To continue to provide clear direction in addressing this issue at United Methodist colleges and universities, the United Methodist Church: ;
    Therefore, be it resolved, that The United Methodist Church continue to address this issue through:
      1.    1. Urges United Methodist-related colleges and universities to utilize the United Methodist Social Principle on Alcohol and Drugs (162J), its companion resolution on Alcohol and Other Drugs (#83), and the latest research and proven strategies on alcohol prevention to guide the alcohol and drug policies of their institutions.
      2.    Encourage and uphold abstinence from drinking alcohol as a viable and faith-based option.
    3.    Provide counseling, programming and social events that foster an amenable environment for an abstinence only campus.
            4.    Strongly urge the removal of alcohol-promoting advertisements from campuses and campus sports events.  
          To undergird and assist United Methodist colleges and universities in meeting these goals:
      1.    The collaborating with the Special Program on Substance Abuse and Related Violence (SPSARV), the General Board of Church and Society, and  staff and Interagency Task Force and the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry will , and partner ing with the college presidents and/or staff of United Methodist higher education -related institutions in providing training and resources to address the , as well as other agencies and programs that are working on the issue of reducing college drinking.
      2.    ; and t The ;
              2.promoting an alternative lifestyle that encourages "wellness" without drugs and alcohol, seeking authentic advocates for this alternative lifestyle, and having these advocates promote this image on United Methodist campuses around the world;
      3.carrying out the five components of SPSARV on college campuses: Leadership  Development, Community Demonstration Programs, Advocacy, Grants, and Educational and Promotional Resources;
      4.strongly recommending that United Methodist-related colleges and universities uphold abstinence from drinking alcohol as a viable and faith-based option, and that these institutions provide/continue to provide programming and social events that foster
      such an environment; General Board of Church and Society will continue to
    actively advocate and engage the Church in advocating for legislation and
    regulations which discourage the use of alcohol by youth and young adults and
    the use of alcohol advertising to market to youth and young adults.
      5. strongly urging campus leadership to remove alcohol-promoting advertisements from the campuses and sports events.
      ADOPTED 2004 See Social Principles, ΒΆ 162 <http://www.cokesburylibraries.com/NXT/gateway.dll?f=id$id=BODBOR2004%3Ar%3A319$cid=BODBOR2004$t=document-frame.htm$an=JD_paragraph162$3.0> J. 
      
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    1 National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. NIAAA council approves definition of binge drinking (PDF–1.6Mb). NIAAA Newsletter 2004; No. 3:3. Accessed March 6, 2006.

    2 Town M, Naimi TS, Mokdad AH, Brewer RD. Health care access among U.S. adults who drink alcohol excessively: missed opportunities for prevention. Prev Chronic Dis [serial online] 2006 Apr.

      3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Trends Data, Alcohol Use: Binge Drinking. Accessed November 29, 2005.

    4 Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Drinking in America: Myths, Realities, and Prevention Policy (PDF–103K). Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation in support of the OJJDP Enforcing the Underage Drinking Laws Program. U. S. Department of Justice. November 2001.

      5 Ibid

    6 Serdula MK, Brewer RD, Gillespi C, Denny CH, Mokdad A. Trends in alcohol use and binge drinking, 1985–1999: Results of a multi-state survey. Am J Prev Med 2004;26(4):294–298.

    7 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control website(CDC), Binge Drinking Statistics, /www.cdc.gov/alcohol/quickstats/binge_drinking, 2007.