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The Petition is amended as follows:
3rd paragraph, pages 850-851 of The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church:
   At the beginning of the 21st century, the world is faced with an unprecedented global environmental crisis a devastated global economy increasingly unequal and exploitative, the pandemic of HIV/AIDS, the spread of weapons of mass destruction, terrorist actions which recognize no borders, and gross violations of human rights and humanitarian law. No country can develop solutions to these grave concerns alone. Unfortunately, the United States has time and again insisted that they can act alone. A leading U.S. columnist, Anna Guindlen (Newsweek, March 10, 2003), asks the question “What is required of a nation that is not only the greatest democracy but the nation by which all other democratic attempts have been measured?” and one of her answers is “The danger in having enormous power is that the ambition to use it for good can so often be subverted by the temptation to use it for dominance.” The United States has embarked on such a foreign policy (spelled out in its National Security Strategy) which assumes its supremacy in the world. The United States maintains global military dominance and the right of a preemptive military attack against any country it regards as a current or even a potential future threat. In addition the U.S.A. is manipulating international law, weakening international cooperation and using multilateralism only if its self-interest is preserved. The U.S.A.:
1. accounts for 50 percent of the world’s military spending, devotes more than $1 billion a day to military spending and has the largest number of military bases around the world. The U.S.A. has abrogated the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty It has refused to ratify the Treaty to Ban Landmines;
2. has the largest nuclear arsenal and has undermined the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty while expressing support for testing new nuclear weapons and refusing to rule out a nuclear first strike against non nuclear nations;
3. derailed negotiations to improve international inspection systems to monitor and prevent the production of biological and chemical weapons. Dismissed the need for broad international cooperation in its war on terrorism, preferring to act alone or with selected allies. Renounced the U.S. signature on the treaty to create an International Criminal Court and campaigned aggressively to exempt all U.S. personnel from its jurisdiction;
4. treated human rights as an obstacle to rather than an essential component of civic security at home and abroad. Suspended U.S. support for the UN’s family planning programs and balked at supporting the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Walked out on the World Summit against Racism, Racial Discrimination and Xenophobia.
  5. withdrew from global efforts to curb global warming thru the Kyoto Protocol on reducing carbon emissions. Continued to pursue a global economic agenda that is of, by, and for transnational corporations. Has blocked efforts to build international rules to enforce labor and consumer rights and environmental protections. Slighted global efforts to mobilize an offensive against the spread of AIDS, instead privileged the financial interests of pharmaceutical companies over the need for affordable life-saving medicines.
6. undermined the Oslo peace process, condoned the Israeli reoccupation of Palestinian territory, and rejected UN Security Council resolutions supported by previous administrations that provide a framework for conflict resolution containing strict security guarantees for both Israel and the Palestinians.
Therefore, the United Methodist Church urges United Methodists to take seriously the question, “How does God's love abide in anyone who has the world’s goods and sees a brother or sister in need and yet refuses to help?” and agree that for the followers of Christ there is but one answer, “ . . . let us love, not in word or speech, but in truth and action” (1 John 3: 17 and 18).
While this resolution addresses primarily the United States because it is the greatest power in the world, the United Methodist Church recognizes that several other nations such as the other members of the G8 (France, Germany, United Kingdom, Japan, Italy, Russia, and Canada) as well as China and other less powerful nations should not be forgotten when implementing the following recommendations:  of its position of power in the world, we call on United Methodist Churches in all countries of the world to work in their own countries and together to advocate for their countries to work in defense of international law and cooperation, through multilateral efforts to be witnesses of God's love for all humanity by promoting the eradication of poverty, sustainable development, justice, human rights and peace around the world.
We therefore recommend:

1. That The United Methodist Church including its agencies and institutions of higher education must find ways to implement the following resolutions from The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church: that a) encourage local churches and members to take actions that make for peace and to act in concert with other peoples and groups of goodwill toward the achievement of a peaceful world and b) Globalization and Its Impact on Human Dignity and Human Rights #309, which reminds United Methodists that “The indivisibility of human rights underscores the understanding that freedom is hollow without food, that justice without jobs is like a clanging cymbal, and liberty is a sham when people do not have land to inhabit and farm.” [From resolution #309, Globalization and Its Impact on Human Dignity and Human Rights]
  The United Methodist Church must urge the USA to:
2. That United Methodists urge the governments of their countries:
       a.    to commit itself  themselves to the fundamental principle of international justice-that no country is above international law;
    b.    to increase its commitment to multilateralism including the UN security system, while urging UN action against threats to peace;
    c.    to renew efforts to mobilize a global consensus and global action against all forms of terrorism at home and around the world;
    d.    to strengthen multilateral, verifiable arms control regimes that aim to curb weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems, while at the same time promoting nuclear disarmament and international demilitarization. Extend treaties to ban cluster bombs, carbon filament bombs, depleted uranium and herbicides;
    e.    to exercise leadership for protection of the environment through the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol and other international environmental agreements while protecting existing multilateral environmental agreements from challenges by free trade agreements;
    f.    to increase the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria as well as other efforts to respond to the AIDS Pandemic;
    g.    to ratify and enforce the new International Criminal Court which judges individuals and groups of individuals who commit crimes against humanity; and
    h.    to expand the international human rights regime by ratifying such key international human rights treaties such as the Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; the International Labor Organizations core labor rights conventions; the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.
      That the General Board of Global Ministries and the General Board of Church and Society, in consultation with each other, develop resources on the concerns described above, including a theological perspective and strategies for advocacy by United Methodists.
That United Methodist Churches, in all countries who belong to the G8, work in their own countries and together to advocate for their countries to work in defense of international law and cooperation, through multilateral efforts to be witnesses of God’s love for all humanity by promoting the eradication of poverty, sustainable development, justice, human rights and peace around the world.

Adopted 2004

See Social Principles, ΒΆ 165.